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  1. #1
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    Fixed Lens Enthusiast Compact Roundup at DPReview


    Pentax K-5 and K-5 IIs; Olympus E-M5 and Stylus 1; Ricoh GR, Fujifilm XF1

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  3. #2
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    I found it interesting that they found the XZ-2 the best all rounder. With the technology today, I don't think anyone can go wrong with any of them.

  4. #3
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    Need to see some bargain pricing emerge on the XZ-2!
    Chuck

    Fuji X100/X10/X-E1/X-E2, Panasonic LX7/LF1

  5. #4
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    Yeah, that's what I think. All of my cameras currently are interchangeable-lens models. The Oly E-PM1 (soon to be replaced by an E-PM2) essentially replaces all of the small-sensored compacts that I had. But I wouldn't mind having one fixed-lens enthusiast compact with roughly a 24-28mm to 100-120mm zoom range and the latest sensor technology. I'm sure most companies will be introducing models with one-inch sensors in 2013 to compete with the RX100. But when the prices fall on the the XZ-2 (and maybe the LX7 again), I'll be ready to pounce. I actually like some of the LX7's features over the XZ-2 but either would be a steal at $250 or less. The best part is, I have both Panasonic and Olympus EVFs for those cameras. Maybe the prices will fall sooner than we think.
    Pentax K-5 and K-5 IIs; Olympus E-M5 and Stylus 1; Ricoh GR, Fujifilm XF1

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  7. #5


    Quote Originally Posted by Djarum View Post
    I found it interesting that they found the XZ-2 the best all rounder. With the technology today, I don't think anyone can go wrong with any of them.
    Are we reading the same article?

    "What's the best all-rounder?

    If you're looking for a balance of size, image quality (even in low light) and direct control, we'd recommend taking a long hard look at the Sony Cyber-shot RX100, the Olympus Stylus XZ-2 and the Panasonic Lumix DMC-LX7."

    The XZ-2 came in second behind the RX100.

  8. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by lenshoarder View Post
    Are we reading the same article?

    "What's the best all-rounder?

    If you're looking for a balance of size, image quality (even in low light) and direct control, we'd recommend taking a long hard look at the Sony Cyber-shot RX100, the Olympus Stylus XZ-2 and the Panasonic Lumix DMC-LX7."

    The XZ-2 came in second behind the RX100.
    I read the final paragraph as favoring the XZ-2 over the RX-100. However, the wording is a little unclear.
    Chuck

    Fuji X100/X10/X-E1/X-E2, Panasonic LX7/LF1

  9. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Crsnydertx View Post
    I read the final paragraph as favoring the XZ-2 over the RX-100. However, the wording is a little unclear.
    I thought they gave a slight overall nod to the XZ-2 as well, but certainly close enough that it really doesn't matter. The takeaway for me is that we have a lot of highly capable P&S options to choose from. It will be very interesting to see who else can bring a 1" sensor to the party like Sony. If Fuji can do it with the next gen X10 and keep the lens fast at the long end I will be first in line to pre-order. Despite Fuji's issues with "getting it right the first time".

  10. #8
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    DPReview doesn't fault the RX100 in terms of image quality. But they do say they find its control interface results in a less than engaging shooting experience. That's why they seem to lean toward the XZ-2.
    Pentax K-5 and K-5 IIs; Olympus E-M5 and Stylus 1; Ricoh GR, Fujifilm XF1

  11. #9
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    Kareem Abdul Jabbar


    FWIW, here's the concluding paragraph in the "best all-rounder" discussion:

    Much as we like the Panasonic LX7, the longer lens, excellent JPEGs and engaging user interface make the XZ-2 stand out for us. The XZ-2 is one of the nicest cameras in this group to use, featuring extensive customization inherited from Olympus's PEN-series interchangeable lens cameras. This is a serious enthusiast camera and easily one of the best of its type that we've encountered. Really the Olympus's strongest competition comes from the Sony RX100 - which at least matches it for image quality but doesn't quite offer the sense of engagement that we appreciate in the XZ-2's operational ergonomics.

    Although they called the XZ-2 and RX100 co-winners of the category (and included the LX7 among the three but dismissed it partway down because they preferred the XZ2), it sounds to me like they actually prefer the XZ2 to the Sony too, referring to the RX100 as the XZ2's "strongest competition" but then mostly dissing it, barely acknowledging its IQ is actually a good deal better, at least in low light. I personally didn't like the RX100 much at all, but it was clear to me the IQ of the RX100 blew the doors off of the smaller sensor competitors in low light, with the possible exception of the X10, which retains its doors but had some damage to the windows perhaps!. Their praise for the RX100 is far more grudging than mine, and I thought mine has been pretty damn grudging! If the Oly had a 24mm wide end, a multi-aspect sensor, and a distance scale/DOF scale for manual focus (which I don't think it does based on all I've read, but please correct me if I'm wrong), I might prefer it to the LX7 for the flip screen / touch screen alone - which I LOVE on the OMD. But without those things, the LX7 has a better set of tradeoffs for me. I'd much rather have the greater range at the wide end of the lens than the long end personally and the multi-aspect sensor is something I wish EVERY camera had. With that and the very handy external switch, I end up using that a LOT. And with its step zoom, manual focus controls, and its ability to remember the last manual focus setting when you switch back to manual focus (also insanely quick and easy with an external switch), I find the LX7 roughly as easy for zone focussing as the Ricoh "snap focus" system which was designed specifically to facilitate that. I don't think the Oly comes close to that functionality, which matters a lot to me but probably a good bit less or not at all to the vast majority of folks looking at these cameras. Actually, if the Sony had included any sort of distance scale as part of its manual focus system, I'd have probably stuck with that despite its funky and "un-engaging" interface.

    Tradeoffs, tradeoffs, tradeoffs...

    -Ray
    We judge photographers by the photographs we see. We judge cameras by the photographs we miss - Haim Zamir

    My Flickr Stream of Consciousness

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  13. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ray View Post
    If the Oly had a 24mm wide end, a multi-aspect sensor, and a distance scale/DOF scale for manual focus (which I don't think it does based on all I've read, but please correct me if I'm wrong), I might prefer it to the LX7 for the flip screen / touch screen alone - which I LOVE on the OMD. But without those things, the LX7 has a better set of tradeoffs for me. I'd much rather have the greater range at the wide end of the lens than the long end personally and the multi-aspect sensor is something I wish EVERY camera had. With that and the very handy external switch, I end up using that a LOT. And with its step zoom, manual focus controls, and its ability to remember the last manual focus setting when you switch back to manual focus (also insanely quick and easy with an external switch), I find the LX7 roughly as easy for zone focussing as the Ricoh "snap focus" system which was designed specifically to facilitate that. I don't think the Oly comes close to that functionality, which matters a lot to me but probably a good bit less or not at all to the vast majority of folks looking at these cameras. Actually, if the Sony had included any sort of distance scale as part of its manual focus system, I'd have probably stuck with that despite its funky and "un-engaging" interface.

    Tradeoffs, tradeoffs, tradeoffs...

    -Ray
    +1. I agree with this completely. I like the XZ-2 but, on balance, I think the LX7 is a better compromise for my use. Of course, if Panasonic could wedge in a one-inch sensor in the LX7 without increasing the size too much, that would get my attention. But I'm sure it would cost about the same as the RX100. With all of the other cameras I own and that I could use if I need a larger sensor, I'm not sure paying that much for this type of enthusiast compact makes a lot of sense.
    Pentax K-5 and K-5 IIs; Olympus E-M5 and Stylus 1; Ricoh GR, Fujifilm XF1


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