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  1. #21

    I buy cameras because they are beautiful/intriguing/interesting and then scour the internet to find reviews that support my purchase decision with high technical scores.

    Simple really.

    Gordon

  2. The following 6 members thank flash for this post:


  3. #22
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
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    Campbellsville, KY
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    Stephen Noel
    Gordon,
    That's the smart, safe way.
    Steve

  4. The following member thanks snkenai for this post:

    BBW

  5. #23
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Newcastle, Australia
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    5,430
    Real Name
    Sue

    Quote Originally Posted by flash View Post
    I buy cameras because they are beautiful/intriguing/interesting and then scour the internet to find reviews that support my purchase decision with high technical scores.

    Simple really.

    Gordon
    I like that. It lets you justify any decision you make :)
    Sue
    --------------------
    Flickr | OLD Blog
    Gear: Mostly Nikon V1+J1, but also the Fuji X100, and the Pentax K-5 seems to be back in use again.

  6. The following member thanks kyteflyer for this post:

    BBW

  7. #24
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    NW corner of CT
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    13,066
    Real Name
    BB
    Gordon, I like your style.
    BB

    **an evolving photographer.

    ~ BB's Flickr photostream & Flickriver or Fluidr

  8. #25
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    UK
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    5,065
    Real Name
    Polly Warmtone
    He's got it spot-on ... I reckon that's how almost everybody works, whether they realise it or not ...
    My photostream at Flickr.com is here
    Stuff about why I take snaps here: Making something new in the World
    __________________________________________________ __________________
    "We can not shake the illusion of the truthfulness of photography" - William Gedney

  9. #26
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Huntsville, AL
    Posts
    1,228
    Real Name
    Jason

    I'm really just starting on this journey of photgraphy, so this might be taken with a grain of salt.

    I remember when the G1 first came out. I thought that it would be a good move up from my point and shoot camera. The biggest complaint I had was the size. I loved the ergonomics though. Then the E-P1 came out. For a few months I mulled over buying the camera. At the time, the image quality was acceptable even by the "dpreview forum standards"(two and a half years later, 12mp sensor is now utter crap ). Sight unseen, I pulled the trigger. Sure I looked at dpreview samples and DXO mark scores, but at the time anything was better than my point and shoot. Six to eight months after owning the camera, I ended up having a bi-polar relationship with the camera. I loved the image results, but the camera became frustrating for me to work with. The ergonomics for me were always off. The only thing I loved about the camera was the verticle thumbwheel. In my hands the camera seemed off balance. The AF was slow, especially with the kit lens. But I loved the kit lens compactness. Of course, its an utterly crappy kit lens along with the 17mm pancake

    Fast foward another year and I picked up an E-PL2. Ergonomically, in many ways, much better than the E-P1. The camera doesn't feel out of balance now. But drats, I no longer have that verticle thumbwheel. I'm also stuck with the same 12mp that now is being touted as 2 year old technology. The AF is much better with the kit lens, and slightly better with the pancake. The image output is almost as good as the E-P1(I don't know. They played with the jpeg engine and I still seem to get it right. The AWB is better, but the images from the E-P1 still seem a tad bit punchier).

    At the end of the day, ergonomics for me plays even a more important role than Image output. It's, at least for me, buying a tiny sportscar. I'd rarely drive it because I'm too big to fit comfortably in the car.

  10. #27
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Principally Mumbai India but I spend a lot of time in the South of France and have a house in Devonn
    Posts
    2
    I have had terrible advice from camera stores in the past and find that the combination of online reviews and blogs enables me to form an opinion sufficiently robust to make a buying decision. My last three compact camera purchases ( G1X, X100, DP2M) were in fact all made with the full knowledge of the cameras shortcomings and in every case I found the camera better ( in the case of the X100, far better) than I was led to expect.

  11. The following member thanks Chrissearle23 for this post:


  12. #28
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Maine, USA
    Posts
    292
    Gorgon has got it in a nut shell. You can use all the justifications you like, but people buy cameras because they think they are cool.

    I really don't like to have lots of gear. I find a two camera system ideal. I like each camera to bring something unique. I go to places like DP Review and just check there is nothing wrong with the camera. Whether it is the bestest or mostest, I really don't care--the photographer is more of a factor to whether the camera will take good pictures than anything else. There are a few criteria I find important. But AF speed and how many pixels are not among them. I don't rank personal experience very high--most of those folks are really not evaluating the camera, but flattering their ego. The nitpicking drives me crazy (is packaging really that important?). As far as personal experience, I really enjoy The Camera Store as they really give the camera a far shake and you know that Chris just loves the gear, no matter what it is.

    But I am also in a fortunate position. I have had years experience with a variety of camera types and formats. I really don't have to handle a camera before I purchase it. But even when I have the opportunity, it is really not important. It always takes me a few months to come to terms with a new camera. I usually need a project to really know how the camera works. Beyond obvious technical limitations (but AF is not one of them), it is never the camera that could not get the "shot," but the lack of the photographer's skill. I really don't believe a good craftsman blames his tools.

  13. The following member thanks Hikari for this post:


  14. #29
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Brisbane, Australia
    Posts
    2,929
    Real Name
    Nic
    A good craftsman is more likely to blame him/herself for choosing the wrong tool in the first place.

    P.S. +1 for The Camera Store videos
    Nic (Canonite, Olympian, Panasonian, Samsunite) ~flickr~

  15. #30
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Southern California
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    1,201
    Real Name
    Gary Ayala
    Quote Originally Posted by Hikari View Post
    ... But I am also in a fortunate position. I have had years experience with a variety of camera types and formats. I really don't have to handle a camera before I purchase it. But even when I have the opportunity, it is really not important. It always takes me a few months to come to terms with a new camera. I usually need a project to really know how the camera works. Beyond obvious technical limitations (but AF is not one of them), it is never the camera that could not get the "shot," but the lack of the photographer's skill. I really don't believe a good craftsman blames his tools.
    I echo Hikari. Additionally, I am more concern about the system behind the camera than the camera itself. I feel that the differences in IQ between between, Nikon, Canon, Olympus, Panasonic, Fuji, et al, is insignificant. I shoot a lot of action so I look at AF/CAF speed and FPS. I shoot a lot of low light, so high ISO noise is important. But most modern, high level cameras, easily tackles fast AF, high FPS and low noise at elevated ISO.

    I purchase on a 'need' basis, my shooting needs. Those needs mainly revolve around lenses and accessories. All things being equal, then I measure the physical looks of the camera, (yes, I am shallow), and finally ... maybe handling and feel.

    I don't believe the grass is greener... Once I buy into a camera system, i stick with it for years and even decades. It is more important for me to use the same equipment repeatedly, to a point when camera manipulation is automatic, an extension of my hands and eyes, than shift to other systems in order to gain an insignificant advantage in dynamic range, or noise, et cetera. Hikari is right, it is the photographer that misses 'The Shot', not the camera. Staying with one system, learning that system inside out, increases the chances to consistently capture 'The Shot' day-in and day-out.

    Gary
    Last edited by Gary; February 2nd, 2013 at 01:09 AM.
    "Everywhere you look there are photographs, it is up to us photogs to see them."- Gary Ayala
    My Snaps are Here: Unsharp At Any Speed

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