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Anybody get these oversaturated highlights and colour tones?

Discussion in 'Image Processing' started by TraamisVOS, Jun 1, 2014.

  1. TraamisVOS

    TraamisVOS SC Hall of Famer

    Nov 29, 2010
    Melboune, Australia
    I've been photographing some jazz performances under artificial lighting. I don't recall getting these oversaturated highlights and saturated colour tones from my Leica. I know it's due to the stage lighting but this is insanely oversaturated to the point of clipping.

    All photos below are unprocessed.

    These shots are from the Canon 7D DSLR:

    14342419673_ca857fc6ea_c.

    14342422473_ce4001489e_c.

    14135618010_0586f3bffd_c.



    And these were from the Sony A7, the skin tones are completely ruined:

    14342427673_2d350b4a24_c.

    14322234975_f98ca307df_c.
     
  2. Lightmancer

    Lightmancer Super Moderator

    Aug 13, 2011
    Sunny Frimley
    Bill Palmer
    Hoo-hah...

    See what you mean. Was there some UV light involved? I suspect something out of the visible spectrum.
     
  3. Luke

    Luke Super Moderator

    Nov 11, 2011
    Milwaukee, WI USA
    Luke
    That's pretty crazy. Your blue channel is maxed out. You may note that all the colors aren't oversaturated, it's just the blue that appears that way. I think the best way to handle this without affecting everything else is to adjust "levels" for blue channel only.
     
  4. TraamisVOS

    TraamisVOS SC Hall of Famer

    Nov 29, 2010
    Melboune, Australia
    I have no idea, I wouldn't expect them in this setting but I have no idea how they're used in concert lighting.
     
  5. TraamisVOS

    TraamisVOS SC Hall of Famer

    Nov 29, 2010
    Melboune, Australia
    Doesn't work very well when I do that. It does not get rid of the colour and even when I max out the desaturation, there's still the mega-overclipped blue highlight outline in the photo.
     
  6. Luke

    Luke Super Moderator

    Nov 11, 2011
    Milwaukee, WI USA
    Luke
    I remember I had this thing happen when shooting a red flower. The red channel was just way overexposed (which seemed counterintuitive to me at first). I'm not talking about turning down the saturation in the blue channel. The blue channel is just "overexposed" (I think). Can you just adjust the "exposure" for the blue channel? I forget the right terminology to use in Lightroom, but saturation is not the problem (I don't think).
     
  7. TraamisVOS

    TraamisVOS SC Hall of Famer

    Nov 29, 2010
    Melboune, Australia
    hm... I didn't think about adjusting the exposure, I've only messed about with the saturation. I shall try that (after I've had a sleep... very tired).

    What I've been doing to try to counter the more manageable skin colour tones is to counter the reds with green tint. I sometimes have to apply several layers of maxed out green tint to bring the skin tones back to manageable levels.
     
  8. Luke

    Luke Super Moderator

    Nov 11, 2011
    Milwaukee, WI USA
    Luke
    Here's a few links that may help explain it better than I can. But after I read through them all, I had a better understanding of what was going on (even if I can't explain it properly). It may help you in your tweaking.

    http://www.cambridgeincolour.com/tutorials/histograms2.htm

    http://www.bobatkins.com/photography/tutorials/clipping/clipping.html

    http://www.luminous-landscape.com/tutorials/restore-clipped.shtml

    Hopefully between these articles and a good night's sleep, you can shake those blues.
     
    • Like Like x 2
  9. TraamisVOS

    TraamisVOS SC Hall of Famer

    Nov 29, 2010
    Melboune, Australia
    Thanks for those articles, I will get down to reading them when I wake up. I didn't even think to do a search!


    hrdy hrdy hrrrrrrr
     
  10. wt21

    wt21 SC Hall of Famer

    Aug 15, 2010
    Split toning (HSL), adjust the luminance sliders
     
    • Like Like x 1
  11. jloden

    jloden SC Veteran

    266
    Jun 30, 2012
    Jay
    Yes, just looks like overexposed blue channel to me also. I've shot a few concerts and events for our church with blue and red stage lights and it's part of the 'fun' of trying to juggle a workable exposure, white balance and skin tones. :D

    Sometimes I've had no choice but to lose highlights blowing out the blue or red channel, really just depends on the range of tones.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  12. TraamisVOS

    TraamisVOS SC Hall of Famer

    Nov 29, 2010
    Melboune, Australia
    Reading these articles now, not finished yet.. but I'm not exposing to the right though, as suggested by these articles. In fact I tend to expose to the left to underexpose.
     
  13. TraamisVOS

    TraamisVOS SC Hall of Famer

    Nov 29, 2010
    Melboune, Australia
    What do you mean you lose highlights? Do you mean you intentionally allow it to clip?
     
  14. Luke

    Luke Super Moderator

    Nov 11, 2011
    Milwaukee, WI USA
    Luke
    James, instead of looking at the regular histogram (because your exposure IS fine), you need to look at a separate histogram for the blue channel. I think that will show you what is going on.

    In that article that uses the red motorcycle image, it's a similar thing, but with the red channel. The overall image is properly exposed, but the red channel is a bit blown out. Your images (I think) are the same, but with the blue channel blown out.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  15. jloden

    jloden SC Veteran

    266
    Jun 30, 2012
    Jay
    Right, sometimes you have no choice but to clip some of the (color) highlights. In principle it's the same as if you had a hot spotlight on one part of the scene, except that it's specific to a color channel. So your exposure is fine, as Luke said, but you probably have a blown out blue channel.

    I first encountered this phenomenon shooting photos of red flowers, where the overall exposure would seem ok but the flower would turn to mush because the red channel was over-exposed/saturated. The only way to deal with it that I'm aware of is basically to lower your exposure down (underexpose the image, basically) and then adjust it back up in post so you don't clip the red channel - or blue channel in your case.