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bountiful tomatos are NOT a problem. Solution #1

Discussion in 'Color' started by Luke, Sep 4, 2014.

  1. Luke

    Luke Super Moderator

    Nov 11, 2011
    Milwaukee, WI USA
    Luke
    At this time of year (in this part of the northern hemisphere), I often hear people complaining about having too many tomatoes turning ripe at the same time in their gardens. I don't even have a garden this year, but everyone's overflow is coming my way. No worries..... I LOVE tomatoes.....more than cameras, even. Last night a made a salad of tomatoes and bell peppers in Italian dressing. Yum, yum. Sometimes, I'll eat them just like an apple. Just bite right into a whole one, add a little salt and pepper and bite again.

    But sometimes, you gotta seek out ways of using up more of them in a way that can buy a little time or a way that makes them easier to share with others. This afternoon, I looked at the growing pile and thought "Salsa!" I read a few recipes online about making Salsa. I found a recipe for Salsa Quemada (quemada means burnt apparently..... I should be able to handle that :wink:) here....... http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/Salsa-Quemada-Roasted-Tomato-Salsa-358769

    It felt foreign to me to put tomatoes on a grill (I like them chilled usually..... or room temperature. I DO NOT like hot tomatoes....I know....I'm weird) So 5 smallish to medium sized tomatoes to one jalapeno is the ratio I try tonight. I have no garlic cloves in the house so I will add some bottled stuff later. Also, you can "roast" the veggies indoors in a dry pan over medium heat. Open up the windows.....apparently this a smoky operation. I did it on a gas grill, but these would be REALLY good on a charcoal or wood grill.
    IMGP3946 by Luke Lavin, on Flickr

    Rotate them to brown them evenly on all sides. The skins will darken and shrink up, but try to keep intact as best you can. And save those skins.....there's lots of flavor in there (and lycopene.......the stuff that makes tomatoes awesome for you)
    IMGP3947 by Luke Lavin, on Flickr

    After they were getting pretty charred and mushy, I brought them in the house and carefully removed the tomato top core bit and the jalapeno stem (I should have taken out the jalapeno seeds too.....that's where the heat is. I'm fine with it, but my wife may think it's a bit too hot.....we'll see). I like the way it looks a bit like a grisly murder scene.
    IMGP3949 by Luke Lavin, on Flickr

    Diced up one small yellow onion. Any onion will do, but I like a sweet Vidalia or the simple yellow onion best. Next choice would be a white onion. Red onions do not enter my house.
    IMGP3950 by Luke Lavin, on Flickr

    I put the roasted toms and pepper in the blender with the diced raw onion. I added some roasted garlic (from a bottle) and about a teaspoon of salt. My blender only has an on/off switch....none of those fancy settings. So I pulsed it a few times....I wanted to keep some chunks, but my finger slipped on the 5th pulse and I really blended it for a few seconds. I caught it before it was total soup. And I could always add some fresh diced tomatoes for texture (there's always more), but it's pretty tasty as it is. Have a taste......
    IMGP3951 by Luke Lavin, on Flickr

    for the gear heads, I used a Pentax K-30 with Tamron 17-50 f2.8. The onions were RAW, the files are JPEG.....cooked in camera.
     
    • Like Like x 13
  2. Andrewteee

    Andrewteee SC All-Pro

    Jul 8, 2010
    Yum! Lovely idea! Sadly, here in California with the drought, no tomatoes for us this year.
     
  3. krugorg

    krugorg SC All-Pro

    Sep 26, 2011
    Minnesota USA
    Kyle Krug
    Looks awesome, Luke! Thanks for the recipe link - I will have to see if my mother-in-law has any tomatoes left this weekend.
     
  4. marlof

    marlof Trying to focus

    Dec 25, 2010
    The Netherlands
    Marlof
    Fun thread, Luke. Downside is it made me hungry...
     
  5. Gary

    Gary SC All-Pro

    Aug 19, 2012
    Southern California
    Gary Ayala
    To make a proper salsa you need a mocahete.

    Try this tomato salad recipe:
    (From Bottom to Top)
    Layer of sliced mozzarella cheese
    Layers of sliced tomatoes (I used many different varieties, the more colorful the better.)
    Sprinkle beaucoup basil, thyme (sage if you like sage) and some Blue Cheese
    Splash some Balsamic
    Viola!

    Gary

    _1010809.
     
    • Like Like x 3
  6. demiro

    demiro Serious Compacts For Life

    527
    Dec 15, 2011
    Hey Gary, you are a blast from the past. Good to see you!
     
  7. Gary

    Gary SC All-Pro

    Aug 19, 2012
    Southern California
    Gary Ayala
    Hey Dean, thank you. It feels good to see all you guys. I have migrated to Fuji which isn't a compact. But I don't mind coming back and lounging around.

    Gary
     
  8. Jock Elliott

    Jock Elliott SC All-Pro

    Jan 3, 2012
    Troy, NY
    If you find yourself with an excess of salsa (unlikely, I think), it goes great over an omelet.

    Cheers, Jock
     
    • Like Like x 1
  9. Richard

    Richard SC Top Veteran

    561
    Feb 1, 2013
    Marlow, UK
    • Like Like x 3
  10. drd1135

    drd1135 SC Hall of Famer

    Jul 13, 2011
    Southwest Virginia
    Steve
  11. Luke

    Luke Super Moderator

    Nov 11, 2011
    Milwaukee, WI USA
    Luke
    Hey Gary, I'm looking at two of them on Amazon. I like the look of the lava rock one here (looks authentic to me) http://www.amazon.com/Lava-Rock-Mol...UTF8&qid=1409922214&sr=8-3&keywords=molcajete

    But I'm wondering if that is a hassle to get truly clean.....seems like there are lots of nooks and crannies for foodstuffs to get caught in. Maybe this one...... http://www.amazon.com/Vasconia-Gran...UTF8&qid=1409922313&sr=8-2&keywords=molcajete

    Opinions for or against? What do you and Mary Lou use?
     
  12. Djarum

    Djarum SC All-Pro

    Jul 10, 2010
    Huntsville, AL
    Jason
    Luke,

    Looks good. I like cold, sliced tomatoes with a little S&P. I love red onion. I love most onions, but spanish yellow or whites can get a little strong. Luckily down here we get a good supply of Valdalias.

    On the gear front, shouldn't we be talking about grills and not cameras..teehee.

    Jason.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  13. Gary

    Gary SC All-Pro

    Aug 19, 2012
    Southern California
    Gary Ayala
    LOL ... it is sad that one with your taste buds is in Milwaukee. I wouldn't worry about the unevenness, I have both types and both clean up easily enough. The rougher one should be seasoned prior to operation. Toss in a handful of rice and grind it up. It fills in all your nooks and crannies. Shape and volume is more important than finish. For grinding, I prefer the flatter bowl shape over the conical shape just for ease of operation. The smoother one can process wet chilis better than the rough, if you're going for a very fine product. For salsa it doesn't matter. I also make my own chili powder I need the smoother surface to easily grind into a powder.

    The mocahete is the original food processor. You can use it for nearly everything that you'd use an electric device ... it just takes longer ... but it doesn't heat up the ingredients.

    Personally, I'm looking for one with an animal's head on it. :smile: http://www.amazon.com/Molcajete-Pig...bs_misc_6?ie=UTF8&refRID=0GV8Z7YKNHPMHAQG5RBA (sorta like this but better)

    The thing is so heavy that you really want to keep it on the countertop, as opposed to an upper cabinet where it could crash down on your head or break your countertop, or below, where you'll slip a disc hauling it up. So ... look for something on the soft side like wood, to slide under it to protect the countertop. I use a trivet that just happened to have the same footprint.

    You'll also need this: http://www.amazon.com/HIC-Brands-th...qid=1409927425&sr=1-2&keywords=tortilla+press

    and then one of these: http://www.amazon.com/Chamba-Cookwa...&ie=UTF8&qid=1409928015&sr=1-7&keywords=comal

    Hell, just come live with moi, I have all this stuff and fresh tomatoes, tomatillos, peppers, cilantro, avocados all year round. (the avocados are only twice a year).

    Gary
     
    • Like Like x 2
  14. Djarum

    Djarum SC All-Pro

    Jul 10, 2010
    Huntsville, AL
    Jason
    I'm more of a "pico"' fan myself. Fine chopped tomato, onion, jalepeno, cilantro, tomato juice, a touch of lime juice and a pinch of cumin.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  15. Gary

    Gary SC All-Pro

    Aug 19, 2012
    Southern California
    Gary Ayala
    I used a combo ... I start with a salsa base then add some chunks of chopped stuff. (Knives are a lot more fun than a pestal.)
     
  16. Biro

    Biro SC All-Pro

    Aug 7, 2011
    Jersey Shore
    Steve
    Another fan of cold, sliced tomatoes here. Is there a non-hot sandwich on this planet that can't be made better by the addition of tomato slices? I don't mean those ultra-thin, pale excuses for tomato slices that you get in some delis, restaurants and cafeterias. I mean big, thick, honkin' slices with strength.

    Here in New Jersey, where the world-famous Rutgers tomato was developed only a mile from my home, there can never be an excess of tomatoes - or tomatoes that are too big and too juicy.

    EDIT: And don't get me started on cold tomato-and-mozzerella-cheese towers. OMG :thumbup:
     
    • Like Like x 1
  17. Djarum

    Djarum SC All-Pro

    Jul 10, 2010
    Huntsville, AL
    Jason
    Well, if we are going down that road...

    I love cucumbers, tomatoes, a little garlic, thin sliced onion, kalamata olives, olive oil, balsamic vinegar, parmesan, and lots of fresh basil tossed in a salad.
     
  18. Boid

    Boid SC All-Pro

    Dec 15, 2011
    Bangalore, India
    Rajiv
    • Like Like x 2
  19. Gary

    Gary SC All-Pro

    Aug 19, 2012
    Southern California
    Gary Ayala
    LOL ... that is great.
     
  20. Luke

    Luke Super Moderator

    Nov 11, 2011
    Milwaukee, WI USA
    Luke
    I think I'm tripping
     
    • Like Like x 2