Excellent resource for anyone interested in night sky photography

Discussion in 'The Watering Hole' started by Jock Elliott, Dec 15, 2014.

  1. Jock Elliott

    Jock Elliott SC All-Pro

    Jan 3, 2012
    Troy, NY
    check out www.lonelyspec.com

    There is a wealth of information there, including a downloadable guide to photographing the milky way: http://www.lonelyspeck.com/nightscapes-guide/

    Among the other goodies that can be found there are guides to choosing a lens for astrophotography, a point-and-shoot head to head comparison, camera reviews, a milky way exposure guide, and lots more.

    Highly recommended.

    The guide was instrumental in helping me to capture this:

    LX100_handheld_night_shot_008_DxO_Medium_.

    Cheers, Jock
     
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  2. bilzmale

    bilzmale Super Moderator Emeritus

    Jul 17, 2010
    Perth, Western Australia
    Bill Shinnick
    Useful and easy to digest - thanks Jock.
     
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  3. kyteflyer

    kyteflyer ~@¿@~

    Jan 31, 2011
    Newcastle, Australia
    Sue
    Thanks Jock, my interest has been resurrected because of a discovery in some shots from some years ago, of some fairly indistinct features suggestive of a) a nebula and b) a galaxy. I need to find those again, with a longer lens.

    Edit: an easy read. I guess you need to sign up to his classes if you want to photograph other things than the milky way. I shot first with a 15mm lens and it was all very nice but it was BIG and WIDE. And thats a good thing if you want the whole milky way.
     
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  4. TraamisVOS

    TraamisVOS SC Hall of Famer

    Nov 29, 2010
    Melboune, Australia
    I've been thinking about doing some of this, thanks for the link!
     
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  5. Jock Elliott

    Jock Elliott SC All-Pro

    Jan 3, 2012
    Troy, NY
    Sue,

    Of course, the wider the lens, the longer the exposure can be before you get star trailing.

    But if you want to photograph nebulae or galaxies, here are a couple of resources I have discovered that might prove useful:

    http://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/50780267

    http://www.grelf.net/compact.html

    I haven't tried the techniques described (but I have bookmarked them for later reference), mainly because I am interested in capturing the grandeur of the sky, and that requires some foreground to give it context and a wide lens is the way to go for that.

    Cheers, Jock
     
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  6. Jock Elliott

    Jock Elliott SC All-Pro

    Jan 3, 2012
    Troy, NY
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  7. TraamisVOS

    TraamisVOS SC Hall of Famer

    Nov 29, 2010
    Melboune, Australia
    When I've tried to take photos of the moon previously, I've found that I needed a very long lens stopped down by a large margin.
     
  8. Jock Elliott

    Jock Elliott SC All-Pro

    Jan 3, 2012
    Troy, NY
    James,

    I too have found the moon a tough object to photograph. Since it reflects sunlight, it is nearly as bright as the sun, making it virtually impossible to capture any detail if you are also trying to include any foreground in the shot.

    In his book on landscape photography, Carl Heilman suggests that a good starting place for exposure when shooting the moon is: f/11 at a shutter speed that is the reciprocal of the the ISO. So ISO 100 would equal 1/100th second shutter speed.

    Sometimes, if left to its own devices, the camera makes radically different decisions. I got this shot at 800 mm (e). The FZ200 exposed it at ISO100, f/2.8 and 1/1000th second.

    FZ200_moon_032.JPG

    Cheers, Jock
     
  9. kyteflyer

    kyteflyer ~@¿@~

    Jan 31, 2011
    Newcastle, Australia
    Sue
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