Kit with a Superzoom - How do you roll?

Discussion in 'Superzoom Salon' started by demiro, Jul 24, 2015.

  1. demiro

    demiro Serious Compacts For Life

    527
    Dec 15, 2011
    I have been on a simplification kick for a while now. Sometimes more and sometime less successful. I'm envisioning a kit with an m4/3s body and one or two (max) lenses and a good superzoom (not my honorable Nikon P510). The FZ1000 comes to mind, and the newly-announced FZ300 has me a bit intrigued as well. I'd like to see what Panny does for an encore with the FZ1000, but I'm concerned that they will follow Sony's new pricing levels.

    I'm wondering how a superzoom fits in to everyone's kit and philosophy on what to own/carry. I don't think I'll ever be without a cheap one to grab and go with (P510), but I am not sure if I will be happy to have one as more of a main option.
     
  2. dalethorn

    dalethorn Guest

    Luminous Landscape has a rave review of the Canon G3x. Looks like a clear winner for superzooms.
     
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  3. gryphon1911

    gryphon1911 SC Top Veteran

    540
    Feb 6, 2015
    Central Ohio, USA
    Andrew
    I've never really been too keen on super zooms. They are just not for me, honestly. I've never gotten along with them for some reason or another. It is either performance, IQ, lens issues either at the wide or long end. To be honest, I've not used the newest batch of super zoom cameras.

    I have found that I get along just fine with a minimal kit like an EM1, 12-40/2.8 and 75-300/4.8-6.7. Is small when compared to an equivalent kit from a 135 size sensor camera. Yes the 75-300 is slow, but I just work with the limitations the lens provides, which really is only the aperture speed. So far, that seems a compromise I can live with.
     
  4. Jock Elliott

    Jock Elliott SC All-Pro

    Jan 3, 2012
    Troy, NY
    I have what I call "the two camera solution": a Panasonic FZ200, which offers enormous reach (25mm to 600, 1200, even 2400, depending upon your IQ criteria) at constant f/2.8, and the Panasonic LX100, which is my see-in-the-dark camera. I have an LLBean shoulder bag that holds them both with a bit of foam rubber in between. In practice, though, when I go out, I tend to carry the FZ200 in a compact binocular shoulder bag.

    The FZ300 is supposed to offer some splash and dust resistance, as well as the focus system from the FZ1000 and LX100. It is quicker than the FZ200, but you can get the FZ200 for less than US$400 right now . . .

    The fellow who runs the Camera Ergonomics blog was so impressed with the FZ1000 that he sold all his ILC gear.

    I hope this helps.

    Cheers, Jock
     
  5. kyteflyer

    kyteflyer ~@¿@~

    Jan 31, 2011
    Newcastle, Australia
    Sue
    P610 as grab and go (previously was FZ100). TZ60 always in the bag, just in case. Pentaxes or Nikon1s for considered photography. But not for birds anymore. Sometimes I'll take the X100 along with a superzoom or two, as well. Its a mood thing.
     
  6. Biro

    Biro SC All-Pro

    Aug 7, 2011
    Jersey Shore
    Steve
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  7. kyteflyer

    kyteflyer ~@¿@~

    Jan 31, 2011
    Newcastle, Australia
    Sue
    Perfect spy cam. LOL. Its massive though. Dimensionally, its actually larger than the K5. I will quietly envy the 83x but be happy with my 60x.
     
  8. bilzmale

    bilzmale Super Moderator Emeritus

    Jul 17, 2010
    Perth, Western Australia
    Bill Shinnick
    I've been seriously considering getting back into a super-zoom and have been closely watching a s/h FZ200, a new SX60HS and an ex-demo Fuji X-S1 on flea-bay. All were around the $400 AUD mark but I began to realise that the size of these models matched my RX10. The Sony trumps the others in all but reach and I could see me taking out one or the other but not both monsters.

    I then thought again of Jock's two-camera solution (which I support), so began to look again at pocket sized cameras. For $409 I've plumped for a new Pana TZ-70 (XS-50 in US). Gives me 30x zoom, EVF, RAW shooting and compact size - I'm happy again!
     
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  9. dalethorn

    dalethorn Guest

    That's an excellent decision. Given size, reach, and image quality, the ZS50/TZ60/70(?) is the best all-around camera in existence, in my humble opinion. I have several pages of examples on my dalethorn website.
     
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  10. kyteflyer

    kyteflyer ~@¿@~

    Jan 31, 2011
    Newcastle, Australia
    Sue
    TZ70 is a much better option than the TZ60. I think I might sell mine and get the next (TZ80?) I like having a compact with a superzoom but I also like having the bridge style. My P610 isnt much bigger, dimensionally, than my FZ100, but has more reach, and TBH, the IQ is better as well, even without having RAW.
     
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  11. dalethorn

    dalethorn Guest

    When I upgraded from my 18 mp ZS40 to the 12 mp ZS50, I noticed that the images were a little cleaner, but the bigger surprise was how the ZS50's images seemed to 'pop' a little better. Just an impression though - could be my imagination. The 1/2.3 sensor is still limiting compared to a bridge camera with a 1" sensor, but if I were restricted to one camera only for the rest of my life, the ZS50 would be A-OK.

    BTW, one theory holds that Panasonic makes the more fundamental design changes every other year/model. If that proves true, then the 2016 edition might have some nice improvements. Panasonic has demonstrated now that they can build very useful EVF's into every class of camera - even the tiny LF1, so Canon and others really need to get with it. I can do without on the G3x, but not having an EVF will limit my ability to resell it.
     
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  12. theoldsmithy

    theoldsmithy SC Top Veteran

    834
    Jan 7, 2013
    Herefordshire, England
    Martin Connolly
    I find my TZ60 to be incredibly useful as a take-anywhere camera. Going from 24 to 720 mm is fabulous, and the creative filters are quite cool too. And since I discovered that the RAW files can be nicely cleaned up, sharpened and have some of that 'pop' added with a simple LR preset, I find the quality surprisingly good. The EVF is only really useful for emergencies to be honest. I'd be tempted by a model with a better EVF but I can wait for the TZ80 or even 90.
     
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  13. kyteflyer

    kyteflyer ~@¿@~

    Jan 31, 2011
    Newcastle, Australia
    Sue
    It does do a nice B&W, as well :)
     
  14. bilzmale

    bilzmale Super Moderator Emeritus

    Jul 17, 2010
    Perth, Western Australia
    Bill Shinnick
    There are minimal upgrades from TZ60 but a much higher res EVF with a proximity switch is one of them. The reviews I've read (and that's most on the web) don't recommend an upgrade if you have the TZ60.