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My first attempt at a time-lapse video with the LX100

Discussion in 'The Watering Hole' started by Jock Elliott, Aug 20, 2016.

  1. Jock Elliott

    Jock Elliott SC All-Pro

    Jan 3, 2012
    Troy, NY


    200 exposures at 4 second intervals

    Cheers, Jock
     
    • Like Like x 3
  2. kyteflyer

    kyteflyer ~@¿@~

    Jan 31, 2011
    Newcastle, Australia
    Sue
    Nice. It just never occurs to me to do timelapse, and yet, I love the results.
     
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  3. Luke

    Luke Super Moderator

    Nov 11, 2011
    Milwaukee, WI USA
    Luke
    next stop 2000 exposures at an interval of 4 seconds. I assume a power cord of some sort will need to be procured.
     
  4. Jock Elliott

    Jock Elliott SC All-Pro

    Jan 3, 2012
    Troy, NY
    Luke,

    I started with the battery indicating "three bars" -- which is "full" -- but not knowing really how full it actually was.

    I did two TL videos of 200 shots each with no apparent effect on the battery. I did several more this AM, getting up to 1,200 shots before the red battery low indicator popped on. I was in the middle of making another TL video and turned the camera off. The display said "time lapse paused." There is no good way to change the battery with the camera on a tripod. I took the camera off the tripod, detached the baseplate, reattached the camera, and switch it back on. It show a screen like the start of a TL sequence, so I triggered the shutter. It completed the sequence, and created two short videos instead of a single video of 200 shots.

    Here are three additional videos shot this am.







    These were all shot at one shot every four seconds. I think when the wind is really scudding along, I might want to drop the interval to one shot every three seconds. The greater the interval between shots, the more time compression there is.

    Cheers, Jock
     
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  5. Luke

    Luke Super Moderator

    Nov 11, 2011
    Milwaukee, WI USA
    Luke
    I assume this is an in-camera TL feature? Or are you finishing these in software?

    Obviously you set the camera up with how often to shoot. But what determines how many frames are played back per second?
     
  6. Jock Elliott

    Jock Elliott SC All-Pro

    Jan 3, 2012
    Troy, NY
    Yes, this is in-camera software. Going into it, you can set the camera up for as many as 9,999 exposures (you would definitely need an external power source), any interval up to 30 seconds. When the sequence is over, the software announces that the timelapse is complete, and do you want to create the video now? If yes, it gives you various options such as frame rate (I chose 30 frames per second) and some others that I haven't messed with. You confirm that these are your choices, and it then tells you how long the conversion will take. 200 frames take about one minute to convert into a video. 200 frames at 4 second intervals take about 13 minutes to shoot and results in a 7-second video.

    The in-camera software does one other really handy thing. When the video has been created, all the frames that went into it are stored in a folder on the SD card. You can then easily delete that folder from the card, saving space, and leaving only the TL video which you can then import to your computer.

    So the whole thing is an in-camera operation, and I find it super easy. No post-processing; just a finished video as the result. I noticed while I was shooting from the overlook this AM that the camera was adjusting the shutter speed as the amount of sunlight varied as the amount of cloud cover changed.

    Cheers, Jock
     
    • Informative Informative x 2
  7. drd1135

    drd1135 SC Hall of Famer

    Jul 13, 2011
    Southwest Virginia
    Steve
    Too bad all those clouds were in the way. :biggrin:
     
    • Funny Funny x 3
  8. Jock Elliott

    Jock Elliott SC All-Pro

    Jan 3, 2012
    Troy, NY
    The LX100 makes it super easy. See my replies to Luke below.

    Cheers, Jock
     
  9. Luke

    Luke Super Moderator

    Nov 11, 2011
    Milwaukee, WI USA
    Luke
    We'll be expecting your own personal "Koyaanisqatsi" shortly.
     
    • Appreciate Appreciate x 1
  10. dalethorn

    dalethorn Guest

    Now there's something I've never done. I should save one of these and use a few of the frames for "sky filler".
     
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  11. tonyturley

    tonyturley SC Veteran

    385
    Nov 24, 2014
    Scott Depot, WV, USA
    Tony
    I used to do these a lot when I had a Nikon L20 P&S. I have an external switch that I used to use when flying the camera on a model airplane. My favorite was taking one photo every 5 seconds for the final hour before sunset, then mashing them into a 25 second video. I luckily picked an evening when the clouds and sunset were very picturesque. You remind me that some of my best work was done before I caught "upgrade fever" a few years ago.
     
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  12. Jock Elliott

    Jock Elliott SC All-Pro

    Jan 3, 2012
    Troy, NY
    Sometimes an upgrade is decidedly NOT what is needed. I am reminded of a story I read decades ago in Editor and Publisher Magazine (a newspaper trade publication). It told the story of a workshop for news photographers. They showed up with anvil cases filled with Nikons and Hasselblads. The guy running the workshop then handed out Kodak instamatics and told the participants to go shoot with them, explaining: "it's not about the equipment."

    Cheers, Jock
     
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  13. tonyturley

    tonyturley SC Veteran

    385
    Nov 24, 2014
    Scott Depot, WV, USA
    Tony
    I agree wholeheartedly with the workshop organizer. I have learned through much buying and selling that the user is more important than the gear. I have been seriously considering selling my gear and buying a single small camera that I can carry in my pocket. No bags. No interchangable lenses. Just simplicity.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  14. kyteflyer

    kyteflyer ~@¿@~

    Jan 31, 2011
    Newcastle, Australia
    Sue
    Likewise Tony. Except I just never get round to advertising which involved photographing and cleaning the gear. So it remains in the cupboard, unused. A pathetic state of affairs, methinks.
     
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  15. tonyturley

    tonyturley SC Veteran

    385
    Nov 24, 2014
    Scott Depot, WV, USA
    Tony
    Agreed, Sue. My work area in my house needs serious decluttering, but I never can seem to carve out the time to do it. Always something else that needs to be done.