ND filter on XZ-1

Discussion in 'Olympus Forum' started by idris, Apr 26, 2012.

  1. idris

    idris SC Rookie

    11
    Apr 26, 2012
    I've done some reaading on Neutral Density filters, but I am struggling to get my head around the use of the XZ-1's ND filter setting.

    What does it do (in ludite terms) and when is it worth using, and when is it best to leave turned off?
     
  2. Ghosthunter

    Ghosthunter boo!

    Sep 8, 2010
    London UK
    Andy
    It acts like having a 3 stop ND filter in front of your lens. An external filter stops light hitting the sensor which is usefull when it's really bright. The XZ-1 has a max shutter speed of 1/2000 sec which isn't that fast so in bright light the ND reduces the shutter speed to a more managegable level. The built in one on the XZ-1 does a similar thing but it basically does 3 stops of neg exposure compensation.

    Hope this is clear!?!?!:smile:
     
  3. idris

    idris SC Rookie

    11
    Apr 26, 2012
    Ah!
    So if I want to use a wide apateur, but the shutter speed indicator is flashing red, if I turn the ND filter on I can (probably) still use the apateur I want? Depth of focus in bright light, right?

    Are there any other ways to use it creatively?
     
  4. andy_g

    andy_g SC Rookie

    18
    Oct 16, 2011
    Roma, Italy
    Long exposures in bright light too
    EG falls shots with water motion effect, of course you need a tripod
     
  5. dhazeghi

    dhazeghi SC Regular

    31
    Jun 4, 2012
    Davis, CA
    I actually use the ND filter a fair amount. The lens on my XZ-1 seems to be sharpest between f/3.5 and f/4.0, and on a bright day at ISO 100, I often need a shutter speed faster than 1/2000s to avoid blown highlights. The ND filter avoids that problem (shutter speed is down to 1/250-1/500s).

    DH
     
  6. Crsnydertx

    Crsnydertx SC Top Veteran

    758
    Jan 21, 2011
    Houston, TX
    Chuck
    DH, what a great idea! I had thought of the ND filter just as a means to achieve out-of-focus backgrounds or slow shutter speeds for waterfall effects. Your suggestion makes perfect sense for someone who does a lot of shooting in strong sunlight; I'll have the ND filter on during my seaside vacation later this summer. Thanks!