ND filter on XZ-1

Discussion in 'Olympus Forum' started by idris, Apr 26, 2012.

  1. idris

    idris SC Rookie

    11
    Apr 26, 2012
    I've done some reaading on Neutral Density filters, but I am struggling to get my head around the use of the XZ-1's ND filter setting.

    What does it do (in ludite terms) and when is it worth using, and when is it best to leave turned off?
     
  2. It acts like having a 3 stop ND filter in front of your lens. An external filter stops light hitting the sensor which is usefull when it's really bright. The XZ-1 has a max shutter speed of 1/2000 sec which isn't that fast so in bright light the ND reduces the shutter speed to a more managegable level. The built in one on the XZ-1 does a similar thing but it basically does 3 stops of neg exposure compensation.

    Hope this is clear!?!?!:smile:
     
  3. idris

    idris SC Rookie

    11
    Apr 26, 2012
    Ah!
    So if I want to use a wide apateur, but the shutter speed indicator is flashing red, if I turn the ND filter on I can (probably) still use the apateur I want? Depth of focus in bright light, right?

    Are there any other ways to use it creatively?
     
  4. andy_g

    andy_g SC Rookie

    18
    Oct 16, 2011
    Roma, Italy
    Long exposures in bright light too
    EG falls shots with water motion effect, of course you need a tripod
     
  5. dhazeghi

    dhazeghi SC Regular

    31
    Jun 4, 2012
    Davis, CA
    I actually use the ND filter a fair amount. The lens on my XZ-1 seems to be sharpest between f/3.5 and f/4.0, and on a bright day at ISO 100, I often need a shutter speed faster than 1/2000s to avoid blown highlights. The ND filter avoids that problem (shutter speed is down to 1/250-1/500s).

    DH
     
  6. Crsnydertx

    Crsnydertx SC Top Veteran Subscribing Member

    758
    Jan 21, 2011
    Houston, TX
    Chuck
    DH, what a great idea! I had thought of the ND filter just as a means to achieve out-of-focus backgrounds or slow shutter speeds for waterfall effects. Your suggestion makes perfect sense for someone who does a lot of shooting in strong sunlight; I'll have the ND filter on during my seaside vacation later this summer. Thanks!