Paper or e-reader

Discussion in 'The Watering Hole' started by Herman, Mar 19, 2011.

  1. Herman

    Herman The Image Stimulator

    Jul 11, 2010
    The Netherlands
    Herman
    What do you prefer and why?
    What's best: monochrome or color e-reader, which one you advice? (manufacturer, type, size)
    Are you using the iPad for reading books etc?
    This is my first serious attempt to take a look into the e-reader issue.
    I do look forward hearing from you, thanks in advance!:wink:
     
  2. christilou

    christilou SC Hall of Famer

    Jul 13, 2010
    Sunny Frimley
    I'm interested too Herman. Would be good to take something slim on holiday rather than a bagful of heavy novels ;) I was wondering how long a battery lasts.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  3. Ray Sachs

    Ray Sachs SC Legend

    Sep 21, 2010
    Not too far from Philly
    you should be able to figure it out...
    E-reader for books. Paper or computer or iPad for magazines and newspapers. I can't read on an ipad for very long - too hard on my eyes - and can't read on one in bright light at all. Its mostly an indoor device. I have a Kindle for books and I can take it anywhere and read it easily anywhere. Its not backlit so you need your own light source (you know, like with a book!) but I can read it for hours without any eye-strain. I don't see the need for color in an ereader unless you're using it for text-books, photo-books, etc but that's not what an e-reader is really strong at. Its really strong at bringing you page after page of text in a really easy to use format. And I'm not aware of any color reader that has the e-ink screen that's so easy on the eyes. The color Nook uses a backlit screen similar to the ipad, for example. But the Kindle, the B&W Nook, the B&W Sony models, and probably others, use e-ink, which is much easier on your eyes and can be read in full sunlight. The other advantage of this type of model is that it uses practically NO electricity. A battery charge on my Kindle can last a month and I never turn it off. It takes no energy to keep the screen written - it only uses energy when you actually turn the page or access a menu. If you leave the cell connection open (for having blogs or newspapers automatically delivered, for example) it will use the battery faster, with a charge lasting maybe only a week. If I'm on vacation and reading heavily and turning pages constantly, I might only get a week out of it. But with my normal reading habits, I only have to charge it about once a month or so.

    I like the Kindle because of Amazon's selection and easy access from ANYwhere. I'm not sure how ubiquitous Amazon is elsewhere in the world, but I know the Kindles are all international now, so it shouldn't be a problem. There may be other models that are just as good using different vendors in Europe and elsewhere? The main thing is the screen - e-ink is the main thing for me. The other differences are just features you can probably adapt to.

    -Ray
     
    • Like Like x 1
  4. christilou

    christilou SC Hall of Famer

    Jul 13, 2010
    Sunny Frimley
    Thanks for your detailed reply Ray, I hadn't given much thought to back lit screens. I need reading glasses so I don't like glare. Lots to think about!
     
    • Like Like x 1
  5. Ray Sachs

    Ray Sachs SC Legend

    Sep 21, 2010
    Not too far from Philly
    you should be able to figure it out...
    If you want a fully capable little computer, the e-readers aren't it (they have very limited capabilities but nothing more). Something like an ipad is much better. But if you want a dedicated device for just reading books, I wouldn't do it on an ipad. That's where an ereader shines. I carry my Kindle on any trip, even to the doctors office, and it has my whole reading list already loaded onto it. If someone recommends a book to me, rather than writing it down somewhere and losing the list, I just flip on the cell connection on the Kindle and download a free sample. Then when I get around to reading it, if I like the sample, one more click buys and downloads the whole book in a matter of seconds. Its a wonderful little device if used for its intended purpose. But its not a competitor to the ipad - its a completely different thing. It actually feels like reading a book after the novelty wears off 10 minutes in to the first time you use it. My wife can read books on her ipad and doesn't mind it, but she can't use it outdoors, so she has a Kindle too and uses that on vacation...

    -Ray
     
    • Like Like x 1
  6. sonomichele

    sonomichele SC Regular

    43
    Jul 6, 2010
    Texas
    We have both a kindle and an iPad as well as laptops. We also have a house full of books as we are avid readers. My thoughts are as follows: ereaders like the Kindle or Nook are brilliant for reading normal books. I don't miss the paper book any longer at all, and I love them for traveling too (so that I don't have to bring an entire backpack full of books on each trip). I have a kindle and love it, but wouldn't say it is much different than the other ereaders. HOWEVER, they are only useful for books, trying to read a newspaper, magazine, PDFs etc on a Kindle is not a pleasant experience in my opinion. The iPad is a much better all around reader if you do a lot of mixed media reading, surfing, reading newspaper and magazines, or reading PDFs (which I do a lot as an academic). I don't find the backlit screen tiring (I turn the brightness low) however you really can't read an iPad out of doors unless you are in heavy shade, only inside. It is also heavier and larger.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  7. Ray Sachs

    Ray Sachs SC Legend

    Sep 21, 2010
    Not too far from Philly
    you should be able to figure it out...
    I agree with everything you said. I wouldn't use the Kindle or other e-ink reader for anything but text based novels (nothing too graphics intensive). I read a lot of those and read 'em on the Kindle. Newspapers, magazines, etc, are infinitely better on a laptop or ipad. If you can handle reading the backlit screen for long periods (some people can, some can't), the ipad can be fine for books too, but I don't know anyone that can read an iPad outdoors. We like to read a lot at the beach or just out on our deck in nice weather, so that's a pretty huge deal in my household.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  8. AzPete

    AzPete SC Veteran

    404
    Dec 24, 2010
    IT's funny you should post this now. I just returned a nook colorbook yesterday. I had purchased one for my wife and myself as I am an avid reader most of the time. The thing with the nook is its only $249 and its already been hacked to
    run droid apps. The unit itself is based on the droid firmware and runs just as good as the ipad, so they say.... screen is very nice. But the nook color as its self really sucks on apps if youre into more things than just reading. You can access the web using only wifi and works great. Music and photos too.
    Although Barnes and Noble did say they would have an app store this spring.... nothing yet.
    Anyways I returned mine cause I just couldnt get into the ereader thing...need to turn a page, if you know what I mean. Meanwhile my wife loves hers....go figure, women!
     
    • Like Like x 1
  9. eolake

    eolake New to SC

    7
    Mar 19, 2011
    I love the Kindle 3, except for the low-contrast screen. If the screen was much higher in contrast (and the device was faster), I think I'd use it a lot more for reading. Color is not all that important when reading, but contrast is.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  10. eolake

    eolake New to SC

    7
    Mar 19, 2011
    Oh, lemme plug my site:
    ereaderjoy.com
     
    • Like Like x 1
  11. eolake

    eolake New to SC

    7
    Mar 19, 2011
    I read A LOT on my iPad. the backlighting is not an issue, you just turn it down a bit. Instapaper lets you read web articles in a higly-readable format without all the links and crap there is on web pages. And of course there's the Kindle app for iPad too.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  12. Ray Sachs

    Ray Sachs SC Legend

    Sep 21, 2010
    Not too far from Philly
    you should be able to figure it out...
    Really? I thought about the best improvement between the Kindle 2 and 3 was the contrast of the screen. The first two versions had pretty low contrast, but I find the 3rd to be very easy on the eyes because of the improved contrast. I was happy with the second version but when I got a 3rd generation for my wife, I was so impressed with the improved contrast that I got another (wifi only) for myself.

    I guess we all have different tolerances.

    -Ray
     
    • Like Like x 1
  13. Herman

    Herman The Image Stimulator

    Jul 11, 2010
    The Netherlands
    Herman
    Thanks for your replies! Does any color e-inkt reader / tablet exist?
     
  14. Ray Sachs

    Ray Sachs SC Legend

    Sep 21, 2010
    Not too far from Philly
    you should be able to figure it out...
    I don't think so. I've heard they're working on it, but I've been hearing that since the first Kindle came around in 2007. I'm not sure how necessary it is - textbooks and magazines and other stuff where color would be important work well enough on a regular tablet with a color backlit screen. The advantage of e-ink is for extended reading of text, particularly in bright light. So with all of the ipad type tablets coming around, not sure why there'd be a huge push for color e-ink...

    -Ray
     
    • Like Like x 1
  15. deirdre

    deirdre SC Top Veteran

    652
    Sep 26, 2010
    E-Reader, specifically an iPad. I prefer it to the e-ink, which is too low a contrast for me.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  16. WJW59

    WJW59 New to SC

    9
    Feb 20, 2011
    Before I compare the current devices, some background. I've been reading e-books on handheld devices since 1995 and I've owned (or own) all of the following: various cell phones; Apple Newton; Handspring Visor; Palm Pilot 1000, M125, T2, TX, and Zire 72; Nook (e-ink); iPhone; and iPad. Out of all of them my preference would be (in order): iPad, iPhone, Palm TX, and Nook.

    I prefer the color screen devices since I'm seldom reading them in direct sunlight and can adjust the backlighting, screen color, and text color to get a comfortable reading setting. I don't find the LCD screen to be a problem once I get my settings correct so I don't have the headache problem many people complain about. The iPad is my choice for anything with detailed graphics due to the larger screen. My iPhone has a lot loaded in it and I can always find something to read and both work with Kindle and Nook books. Both also allow me to do MUCH more than just read. The TX is my fallback as it has a decent color screen, I can convert most non-DRM books to work with it, and it is not much larger than the iPhone. My Nook is my device of last resort. It doesn't handle graphics well, is only so-so with PDFs (even all text ones), the contrast is low, and I have to carry an additional light if the place I'm reading has less than ideal light. I've also found that using the external light always seem to cause either a reflection, glare or hotspot somewhere on the screen. I also think the Nook has a slow to use and fairly poor user interface when compared to my other devices. I have never used a Kindle but I know people that have them and they have UI complaints also.

    Stanza is my preferred reader on the iPhone and I'm going back and forth between Stanza and iBooks on the iPad. The Nook is stuck with whatever B&N puts out and the limits of the device. The Palm TX suffers from the fact that development is dead but I have 4 different readers there so I'm covered until it finally dies.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  17. Herman

    Herman The Image Stimulator

    Jul 11, 2010
    The Netherlands
    Herman
    How about the Archos 7o b ereader? Affordable, sd-card, wifi, 4096 mb internal ram, 800x480 pixels, touchscreen, 7 inch screen.
     
  18. AzPete

    AzPete SC Veteran

    404
    Dec 24, 2010
    hey, great site....going to digest it tonite....looking for that very thing. Thanks
    Pete
     
    • Like Like x 1
  19. WJW59

    WJW59 New to SC

    9
    Feb 20, 2011
    This brings up the other complaint I have with my Nook. It is enough larger than the Palm/iPhone that it isn't really a pocket device. Almost anywhere I can fit the Nook I can fit the iPad. After adding a cover that holds the light (needed) the size and weight are very close to the iPad, but the Archos wouldn't need the light so it might be better. To me it really comes down to cost, battery life, and the feature you want.

    I just can't warm up to these tweener (7") devices. My eyesight may have something to do with it also. :smile:
     
    • Like Like x 1
  20. wt21

    wt21 SC Hall of Famer

    Aug 15, 2010
    I tried an iPad 1. Much prefer my Kindle (the latest model). I prefer it to paper for books! I find magazine and articles, though, are too cumbersome on the Kindle. So those I prefer on paper. I sold my iPad and got an iPhone. Though the screen is uncomfortably smaller, the portability is excellent. Maybe that's why I'm a serious compact shooter? I prefer portability over all, lol.

    I actually like the contrast and experience of reading on the Kindle. I'm not sure that I would change much on it.
     
    • Like Like x 1