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'Reverse engineering' my way through photography.

Discussion in 'Welcomes and Introductions' started by TraamisVOS, Nov 29, 2010.

  1. TraamisVOS

    TraamisVOS SC Hall of Famer

    Nov 29, 2010
    Melboune, Australia
    Hi all, I graduated from film school but wanted to really get into detailed understanding of cinematography and other technical aspects of filmmaking.

    So while waiting to purchase a motion capture camera for filmmaking, I bought myself a 7D to teach myself aspects of cinematography/photography (aperture, f/stops, lighting, composition etc).

    I'm enjoying photography in the meantime, and I've just purchased a Panasonic LX5 for all those times I wish I had the 7D with me but didn't, for reasons of bulk or convenience or just not wanting to carry an expensive DSLR around. Waiting for the LX5 package to arrive right now.

    I assume most people start off with a point-n-shoot or compact first and then progress to a DSLR like the 7D but I seem to have come from the other direction.
     
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  2. BBW

    BBW Administrator Emeritus

    Jul 7, 2010
    betwixt and between
    BB
    TraamisVOS, many thanks for your introduction! You'd might be surprised how many of us have followed that "reverse" path going from a DSLR, or at least an SLR, and found our way to micro four thirds, and other serious compacts.:wink:

    As the proud owner of an LX5, I offer my congratulations upon your upcoming new addition! I'll be looking forward to seeing your photos, Traamis!
     
  3. Amin Sabet

    Amin Sabet Administrator

    Jul 3, 2010
    I'm in that group as well. Started with SLR/DSLR and worked backwards to small sensor compacts and Micro 4/3. Welcome, TraamisVOS!
     
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  4. olli

    olli Super Moderator Emeritus

    Sep 28, 2010
    Metro Manila
    olli
    I started with a film rangefinder, then film compact, then film SLR, then digital compact, then digital SLR then digital compact. Right now I'm completely undecided between NEX (but hanging on to my now 3 year old DSLR) or upgrading the DSLR and waiting a year to see how NEX develops.

    OF course, if I could afford it I would just get both right now:smile:
     
  5. pictor

    pictor SC All-Pro

    Jul 14, 2010
    You might be surprised, if you knew how many did just that, namely switching from heavy DSLRs to lighter cameras like ยต4/3 or even compacts. A Canon 7D is a great camera, but it is heavy and not all people need such a big and heavy camera. Switching to lighter cameras can bring much joy and less pain due to carrying too heavy gear. Today there are small cameras which are capable of things one could only dream of some years ago.
     
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  6. TraamisVOS

    TraamisVOS SC Hall of Famer

    Nov 29, 2010
    Melboune, Australia
    I am indeed surprised to see a few of us who have reversed their way to compacts but after thinking about it, it makes sense. I can see SLR users wanting a more compact solution (but more than just a regular automatic point-n-shoot) for those times when it's a hassle to carry the SLRs.

    Received some tracking info on my LX5, should receive it this Thursday.

    Cannot Wait.
     
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  7. Neil

    Neil SC Rookie

    17
    Sep 7, 2010
    I started with an olympus OM1 ,went to college and used every format up to 10x8 ,left college to work as an assistent at a big mail order studio in london where only large format was used.I had an old hasselblad then.Soon came a leica M4-2 with a 50mm summicron and later a M6 and 35mm summilux.These Ive used for the last 20 odd years and now I have a ricoh gx100 which Im delighted with.So count me in too.
     
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  8. TraamisVOS

    TraamisVOS SC Hall of Famer

    Nov 29, 2010
    Melboune, Australia
    Very nice to hear about other people reversing. I think for many of you who have had the opportunity to work with a number of cameras, because of my music background I see it as a musician who has first started playing with a student instrument, then as their playing progresses they are able to refine their choice of instruments that better define their sound. I assume that for those of you here, the camera you've got now is the instrument that helps you define the look of your photographic work at this stage of your photographic journey.

    Anyone hear about the 'special' news NASA has in store for us later this week about astrobiology and life on other planets? Lots of conspiracy theorists saying that the govt is finally going to own up to aliens 'n things. I think it's great timing since my brand new LX5 is due to arrive tomorrow. No more excuses for unintelligible, out-of-focus, blurry images of flashing lights in the sky after the aliens come out of hiding.

    NASA puts alien believers in a spin with mysterious announcement of 'astrobiology finding' | Space, Military and Medicine | News.com.au | News.com.au
     
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  9. BBW

    BBW Administrator Emeritus

    Jul 7, 2010
    betwixt and between
    BB
    Wonderful analogy Traam!

    Aha, no, I did not know about this "special" news! I shall have to stay tuned, for sure. Good thinking about getting your LX5 charged and ready!:biggrin:
     
  10. Fuddlestack

    Fuddlestack SC Regular

    138
    Dec 1, 2010
    Alsace, France
    It's amazing how much you don't learn with a P&S. Really, they are fantastic photographic computers that do everything for you, so that you don't get a feel for what's happening. Going from an SLR "downwards" is really a much better way to go.

    The best way to go is to get a 35mm camera with no meter (e.g. a 1950s Leica III variant), some 100 ISO BW film and work up from there, judging the light by eye. But then, I'm an old fogey - it's the kind of thing I would say... :wink:
     
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  11. Mal

    Mal SC Veteran

    275
    Sep 23, 2010
    Liverpool / UK
    John...

    I remember those days well.... when it cost US money to develop images, we made sure that the composition and settings of the finished result were the to best of your ability... and that's how we all learnt. In those early learning days if you got 3 good frames out of a roll of 36 you were happy..... :wink:

    You are quite right when you say, "you don't LEARN with a P&S"
     
  12. TraamisVOS

    TraamisVOS SC Hall of Famer

    Nov 29, 2010
    Melboune, Australia
    I do remember those days but I was very young then. I just remember being given a film point and shoot and I only had 12 exposures available which meant i had to 'save' each shot and not waste it.

    But I have to respectfully disagree that you don't learn with a P&S, not entirely! Back when I didn't know anything about f/stops and apertures and FOVs, I was still learning about composition and timing at the very least, shutter speed and ISO of the film. And totally screwing up perfectly good rolls of film.
     
  13. Neil

    Neil SC Rookie

    17
    Sep 7, 2010
    I can understand you thinking this tramisvos but in my case its not quite true.As much as I like the camera that I have, Im using it to put digital on trial.Obviously for me not the world as a whole.So no-one need worry that the digital world will disapear if I decide that I dont approve.Well not as far as I know.:smile:
     
  14. Neil

    Neil SC Rookie

    17
    Sep 7, 2010
    Do lenses still work on f-stops or is it infinately variable,f5.8?etc.Im sure I saw a camera that called the f-stop range BOKEH control.Makes more sense really.Alot of the knowledge gained in the past has no real meaning any more and can be restrictive.Especially as higher asa settings have less and less detrimental effect on the image quality.
     
  15. Fuddlestack

    Fuddlestack SC Regular

    138
    Dec 1, 2010
    Alsace, France
    Well, I didn't say you didn't learn anything, just that an awful lot passes you by. This is fair enough, it's the point of a P&S and I wouldn't change it - sometimes what they do is pure magic. I can remember using the "Night Portrait" mode on my old CP 5900 to take a shot of a tunnel in the Maginot Line, and being astounded by the result. The one on the left is straight flash, the other is the way the 5900 wanted to do it, which is pretty well the way it looked:

    [​IMG][​IMG]

    I spent the rest of that tour leaning against the wall.
     
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  16. TraamisVOS

    TraamisVOS SC Hall of Famer

    Nov 29, 2010
    Melboune, Australia
    It's a sign of the times though, that technology is improving all the time. The next generation of photographers are going to grow up with HDR technology at their fingertips and so photography will change again over time.


    Thanks for posting those two photos. I actually learned something, seeing the two next to each other like that. I really like the one on the right (of course) but also the composition and angle, turning a potentially boring photo into a dynamic one.
     
  17. snkenai

    snkenai SC All-Pro

    Oct 5, 2010
    kenai, AK
    Stephen Noel
    I started with the Brownie Box 620. If I remember right it had 8 frames. Mom and I would pool our money for film and processing. You sent the film to "Fox" and in a few days got the pic and a fresh roll of film, and you were back in the photography business. Then over time had various small cameras, 126, 110, etc.
    Finally in the 80s I think, moved into a "real" camera, 35mm. Used several brands and styles. The Olympus OM-1 was my all time favorite. A few years began to venture into digital P&S, then Bridge (panasonic fz30).
    Three or four years ago I made the jump into DSLR, Olympus e-500, then E-1. But was not happy with the bulky, heavy cameras. I yearned for an OM-1 Digital. And THEN came the PEN. I had to wait for prices to come down, now I have a "nearly" OM-1 digital. It has been a new learning experience, but we have become very close friends. For really heavy lenses I think I will get another DSLR body.
    I really went over the limit with old glass and adapters. Another one yesterday and expecting still another today or tomorrow.
    It's been a great trip (over 50 years), and still learning.

    Steve
     
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