RX1 - exposure lock

Discussion in 'Sony RX1 Forum' started by Muizen, Jun 16, 2013.

  1. Muizen

    Muizen SC Regular

    46
    Mar 25, 2013
    Mechelen, Belgium
    Harry Briels
    When I shoot in Manual Mode, Metering Mode in Center weighted and in Auto ISO:
    how can I determine exposure, thereafter lock the selected exposure, focus, take the shot (with the locked exposure) and end up with the exposure unlocked automatically.

    It is likely that this is not possible in Auto ISO?
    If this is the case how can I do the above but in fixed ISO?
    Thanks for your help!
    Harry
     
  2. rogerc

    rogerc SC Regular

    57
    May 16, 2013
    The Hexagonal.
    Isn't AEL meant for exposure lock? I believe that may be the default function. If history serves for logic, then AEL could also be AF lock and Exposure lock. You just need to dive in the menus and find out whether such option can be assigned to it.
     
  3. Muizen

    Muizen SC Regular

    46
    Mar 25, 2013
    Mechelen, Belgium
    Harry Briels
    Yes, I know about the function of the AEL knob. But I don't want a Exposure lock and simultaneous an AF Lock!
    I am just looking for a Exposure Lock whereafter, while this Exposure lock is active, I then want to AF and take the shot.
     
  4. Huckles

    Huckles New to SC

    2
    May 30, 2013
    ACT, Australia
    Van
    It's in the menus.

    assign it to something other than the AE-L button, that way you lock exposure first, then you can focus as you like.
     
  5. Muizen

    Muizen SC Regular

    46
    Mar 25, 2013
    Mechelen, Belgium
    Harry Briels
    Thank you for trying to help me.
    But I would like to understand what you mean when you say: "assign it"
    Thanks!
    Harry
     
  6. Ray Sachs

    Ray Sachs SC Legend

    Sep 21, 2010
    Not too far from Philly
    you should be able to figure it out...
    Assign "AEL Toggle" or "AEL Hold" to the AEL button (or any other button you'd prefer). If set to AEL "toggle", when you hit the assigned button, the exposure will lock based on that reading until you hit the button again, in which case the exposure lock will be turned off. If you set AEL "Hold", the AEL will lock when you push the botton and will stay locked as long as you hold the button down, but will be unlocked as soon as you release it. When the exposure is locked in this manner, the AF is NOT LOCKED and you're free to re-focus on whatever you want.

    This seems a very obvious use for the AEL button and these options are readily available and apparent in the menus. I haven't had this button set this way, but it took me about 30 seconds to work this out just now. Have you tried playing with the menu options Harry? Many of your questions seem rather easily solved with just a little bit of experimentation...

    -Ray
     
  7. Ray Sachs

    Ray Sachs SC Legend

    Sep 21, 2010
    Not too far from Philly
    you should be able to figure it out...
    Or assign it to the AEL button - it works there too. It seems to be assignable to all five assignable buttons, so use whichever is most comfortable...

    -Ray
     
  8. christilou

    christilou SC Hall of Famer

    Jul 13, 2010
    Sunny Frimley
    I use the AEL button on hold and find this works really easily, this way you don't forget to turn it off when you've finished!
     
  9. Muizen

    Muizen SC Regular

    46
    Mar 25, 2013
    Mechelen, Belgium
    Harry Briels
    I conclude from the above that when I first want to select and lock exposure: I point to the desired light source and then press the AEL button.
    Thereafter I point to the object and half depress shutter button which will focus and lock focus. After that I can then recompose if so required, and take the shot.
    Whether in the menu the "AEL with shutter" is set to On or to Off does have no influence on the above procedure.
    But I assume that is it is best to have this function set to On in case one wants to lock both exposure and focus simulthaneously.
     
  10. Ray Sachs

    Ray Sachs SC Legend

    Sep 21, 2010
    Not too far from Philly
    you should be able to figure it out...
    This function over-rides the shutter button, regardless of whether its set to AEL with shutter or not. What AEL with shutter does is if you half press and establish exposure, as long as you hold that half press, the exposure won't re-evaluate and change settings. So, leaving focus out of it for a moment, if that is set to ON, you can half press to establish your exposure settings, recompose with your finger still in the half press position, and it will NOT re-evaluate exposure or change exposure settings. If you set this to OFF, the camera will constantly re-evaluate and change exposure settings as you move the camera. Regardless of how THAT's set, if you set AEL Toggle or AEL Hold to the AEL (or any other) button, it will lock exposure with either a toggle or a hold and the shutter button will not have any influence on exposure as long as that AEL is either held or toggled on via the AEL button. Only when its not locked via either hold or toggle will the shutter button setting take over operations...

    How do I know this you might ask? I just tried it...

    -Ray
     
  11. Lucille

    Lucille SC Veteran

    324
    Aug 20, 2012
    Hepcat City
    I read a lot of this and just have no clue what is being talked about...


    I have much to understand and learn..

    I always shoot the Rx1 in pure manual mode, I adjust my own ISO, my own shutter speed, and set my own aperature, if it looks good on the lcd screen to my eyes, I know it will be a good picture...


    I usually have my iso set, aperature set, and just adjust shutter speed for a proper exposure, if I cant get what I want then I change the other settings...

    I know what ISO I need to be at for any given shooting situation....

    It is rather simple to me......
     
  12. Ray Sachs

    Ray Sachs SC Legend

    Sep 21, 2010
    Not too far from Philly
    you should be able to figure it out...
    Yes, but you tend to shoot your cars when they're NOT moving!

    I'm kidding, but only sort of. Whatever works for you is the best approach. But I think the last time I spent any serious time shooting completely manually was when I had a Pentax K1000 that only had manual controls. Every camera I've had since has had at LEAST an aperture priority mode. I like shooting automatically as long as I can program the camera to think like I would think in the same situation. Because, while cameras are generally not very smart, they're VERY quick. Often that matters. And even when it doesn't, I'm happy to let them do the thinking for me as long as I've told it how to think and what to prioritize in its thinking and damned if they don't do a great job. So I like aperture priority with some level of auto-ISO mostly and when I switch to manual mode, its to take even fuller advantage of auto ISO settings...

    But its all good as long as you enjoy the process and the results. Most of these miraculous modern cameras are good enough to accommodate all of these preferences quite well...

    How about focus? Do you focus manually too?

    -Ray
     
  13. Lucille

    Lucille SC Veteran

    324
    Aug 20, 2012
    Hepcat City


    And I tend to shoot the many stage musicians in extreme lowlight while they are moving.



    tuc-161.


    tuc-169.


    tuc-172.


    tuc-178.


    I actually do more of this type of shooting then cars, and I never use flash..

    I use both auto and manual focus, it depends on the situation....
     
  14. Ray Sachs

    Ray Sachs SC Legend

    Sep 21, 2010
    Not too far from Philly
    you should be able to figure it out...
    Yeah, I know, but they're moving in place. Their hands are moving and they may be moving with the music (God, I HOPE so!) and even moving around the stage, but the you rarely have to react to making changes to exposure really quickly. And even if you do, I'm not saying you can't or shouldn't. I used to shoot high school football games at night in the '70s using a Pentax K1000 and Plus-X or Tri-X when I could get some. So I know all things are possible. When I'm shooting relatively sedentary or predictable scenes I'm sometimes shooting fairly close to manually too, but I'm almost always letting the camera figure SOMETHING out for me. But, like I said, whatever works for you!

    And if you like shooting manually, all of the stuff we were talking about in this thread doesn't matter or applyl - its all about how to separate auto-exposure from auto-focus when you're using both...

    -Ray
     
  15. Lucille

    Lucille SC Veteran

    324
    Aug 20, 2012
    Hepcat City
    I still have much to learn Daddy-o, much to learn...

    I have been taking images for about 1 year now... give or take a month or two..
     
  16. Lucille

    Lucille SC Veteran

    324
    Aug 20, 2012
    Hepcat City
    In the dark settings with stage musicians, I tend to shoot a shutter speed of 1/250, and usually wideopen on the lens, I can change ISO rather quickly for more sensitivity if needed...
     
  17. Lucille

    Lucille SC Veteran

    324
    Aug 20, 2012
    Hepcat City
    And this Rockabilly group, the Flat Tops, bounce all over the stage, they move and they move fast, not just hands....these cats get way gone!


    tuc-159.


    But trust me, I read damn near every post in this forum and others, always trying to learn, even if it doesn't directly apply to what I do....
     
  18. Ray Sachs

    Ray Sachs SC Legend

    Sep 21, 2010
    Not too far from Philly
    you should be able to figure it out...
    You seem to be soaking up everything you need VERY well!

    -Ray
     
  19. Boid

    Boid SC All-Pro

    Dec 15, 2011
    Bangalore, India
    Rajiv
    You don't need to half press the shutter to get exposure. Point at the scene and press/hold the AEL button to get an exposure lock instead. If you've set it to "AE on" then you need to press it once to activate exposure lock, if you've set it to "AE hold" you need to continue to hold down the button with your thumb to retain exposure info. Click the shutter after recomposing, half press to AutoFocus, shoot.

    I haven't used the RX1, but this is how its generally implemented in most cameras.
     
  20. Muizen

    Muizen SC Regular

    46
    Mar 25, 2013
    Mechelen, Belgium
    Harry Briels
    Dear Ray,
    From your response to my question regarding "AEL shutter" in On or Off position I get, most likely wrongly, the idea that I start to irritate you with my questions?
    You are kind enough to explain to me that when in "AEL shutter in On postion" half pressing the shutter locks the exposure, but I notice, which you do not mention, that this doesn't just lock exposure but it looks focus too.
    This I don't want to happen.

    There are sometimes situations in which one wants to find the best possible exposure (18% gray) by pointing e.g. to a dark green lawn, or dark blue sky, or a gray stone wall etc., lock this exposure and then recompose, focus and shoot.

    What I am trying in this forum is to find the best possible way of accomplishing this using the RX1.
    I am overwhelmed by the large amount of all kinds of settings in the RX1 to which as a former Leica M9 user, I am not accustomed at all.
    The Leica M9 is a rather simple camera and doesn't offer a load of sometimes totally unnecessary settings.

    Again I learned that after pointing to the selected light source I push AEL which locks the exposure and thereafter I recompose, focus and shoot.
    Harry