shopping for a camera holster

Discussion in 'The Watering Hole' started by Luke, Aug 21, 2014.

  1. Luke

    Luke Super Moderator

    Nov 11, 2011
    Milwaukee, WI USA
    Luke
    I decided to get back into shooting DSLRs and have acquired some nice glass to go with it (read that as big and freaking heavy). 5-10 pounds worth of stuff should not be a big burden to carry around. I look around me in Wisconsin and regularly see people carrying around an extra 40 or 50 lbs with them everywhere they go :eek:.

    I figure I just need something to distribute the weight better, because the neck was not designed to carry it. The Cotton Carrier Camera System makes a vest that will make me look every bit the camera dork, but who am I kidding.....if you have a 5 lb. lens attached to your camera, you look like a dork anyways.....may as well be a dork without an aching neck and back. The also make useful videos to show you how people use the products....and sometimes they are funny, as well. I got a kick out of this one so I thought I'd share.....
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=etV02k2Rym0
     
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  2. Tilman Paulin

    Tilman Paulin SC Top Veteran

    681
    Nov 15, 2011
    Dublin, Ireland
    I can highly recommend Mindshift Gears Ultra Light Camera Cover.
    http://www.mindshiftgear.com/products/ultralight-camera-cover
    It wraps around your camera, so it's pretty much always only as big as your current camera/lens combo.
    It has an integrated belt, which is great when you go "minimal". On the flipside I wish they'd make a version that attaches to any belt, so you could add a lens switch case and a water bottle (without worrying about adding extra weight on to the integrated belt).
    But even with that minor gripe, it's the least bulky "holster" that I found (since it has no padding). Works great on hikes.
    ----
    I tried Peak Systems "Capture Pro" camera clip for a while, but didn't like it for hiking. It attaches to a backpack strap and hence puts all the weight unevenly back on one shoulder.
    Apart from that the camera keeps dangling around on your chest, which makes me worried about putting to much stress on the camera's tripod mount.
    Plus you look goofy :)
    The cotton carrier vest seems to be a bit better in some respects, as the camera is dangling not right on your chest, but a bit lower down.
    A big disadvantage I could imagine is that the harness gets in the way of clothing (getting a sweater/coat on and off).
    ----
    Anyway, maybe I'm just a fan of waistpacks. I sometimes have problems with my shoulders (RSI) so I try to keep as much weight off of them as I can.
     
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  3. Jock Elliott

    Jock Elliott SC All-Pro

    Jan 3, 2012
    Troy, NY
    Luke,

    5-10 lbs of gear? You don't need a camera holster, you need an intervention!:biggrin:

    Cheers, Jock
     
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  4. Luke

    Luke Super Moderator

    Nov 11, 2011
    Milwaukee, WI USA
    Luke
    You know Bowling is popular in Wisconsin, right? That ladies' balls are usually around 9 lbs. (the men's are are in the 12-16 range) And they're expected to repeatedly pick them up and hurl them down the alley. This usually goes on for a couple hours.

    Nothing wrong with wanting something smaller and lighter, but if I can get something better and heavier, I better use it while I'm still young enough to haul it...... LOL.
     
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  5. Um, that's a bit intense.

    Never had to pull out my gun in the middle of a photoshot.
     
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  6. Jock Elliott

    Jock Elliott SC All-Pro

    Jan 3, 2012
    Troy, NY
    You're absolutely right: use it or lose it.

    Cheers, Jock
     
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  7. Ray Sachs

    Ray Sachs SC Legend

    Sep 21, 2010
    Not too far from Philly
    you should be able to figure it out...
    Luke, you don't wanna look (or feel) like that guy. And you're not carrying TWO bodies with big-ass lenses, are you? I find a one shoulder sling type strap arrangement works fine with the Df and any of the lenses I have for it (even the heavy-ish 70-300). With a smaller prime I just cinch it up tight while I'm walking and loosen it to shoot. On the rare occasion I have a larger lens, I sometimes support the lens with my right hand. At the end of a long day, my left shoulder can get a little sore, but you're younger than I am!

    BTW, whaddja get? And what lenses?

    -Ray
     
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  8. bartjeej

    bartjeej SC Hall of Famer

    Nov 12, 2010
    bart
    LOL that video was hilarious! :biggrin: it would've been pretty silly without the gun, but with it... wow! That just takes it to a whole new level. The look on his face, and his posture before walking away, make it even more so. Do you think they were intentionally being funny? Must've been, right?
     
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  9. Ripleysbaby

    Ripleysbaby supernatural anesthetist

    Sep 9, 2011
    Cumbria UK
    Garry
    I've also tried the Peak design's clip, leash, wrist strap.
    Black Rapid strap .........
    And on and on .....
    But I just keep coming back to my Billingham Hadley and home made wrist strap.
     
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  10. Luke

    Luke Super Moderator

    Nov 11, 2011
    Milwaukee, WI USA
    Luke
    The thought HAD crossed my mind, but no..probably not.

    The kit is pretty minimal, but two of the 3 lenses are big. I have rejoined the cult of Pentax (mainly just to stay out of the Canon vs. Nikon discussions). I have my "walkaround" lens, the Sigma 50-500mm (which after a brief initial test seems to somehow cheat physics by being a 10x zoom AND be quite sharp). It also focuses fairly close and can be used as a pseudo macro around the 200mm range.

    When I need something wider or when I don't feel like carrying a camera with a 5 lb. lens attached, the rest of the kit is a 17-50mm and a 70-200mm (both of them f2.8 throughout the range).
     
  11. Ray Sachs

    Ray Sachs SC Legend

    Sep 21, 2010
    Not too far from Philly
    you should be able to figure it out...
    Yeah, that's pretty big gear. Even with a full frame DSLR, my basic rule of thumb is that if it doesn't fit in an Ona Bowery, I'm not carrying it around for any length of time. A Bowery will handle the Df with 4-5 small-ish primes or 2-3 smallish primes and my one general purpose zoom (24-120), or some slightly reduced combination of the above with the Nikon A. I have a couple of large-ish lenses, but they come out for specialty shooting, not for typical walk-around shooting.

    If I was carrying the really BIG gear, I'd probably move to Nepal and try to hire a Sherpa... But I probably won't get there - I don't like big gear... Even my 70-300 f4.5-5.6 is more than I like to use very much and it's about as small as you can get with a full frame telephoto of any reach...

    -Ray
     
  12. Biro

    Biro SC All-Pro

    Aug 7, 2011
    Jersey Shore
    Steve
    Happens all the time with me... :biggrin:
     
  13. I use this setup when out for a while. With my old NEX-3.

    Works vertical with a moderate sized lens and horizontal with a small prime.


    IMAG0034.

    IMAG0035.
     
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