Stupid Medium Format Film Question (don't laugh)

Discussion in 'Film Camera Forum' started by bobbywise, Dec 22, 2015.

  1. bobbywise

    bobbywise SC Regular

    43
    Jun 2, 2012
    Nantes, France
    Robert Wisbey
    Hi,

    I use digital and 35 mm film.
    I just got a couple of Fuji rangefinder medium format film cameras (GW690iii and GSW690iii), and have read up on loading the film etc. , plus some YouTube videos.

    So here's my stupid question : when I remove the film, why won't it get overexposed by the ambient light (it's not like 35 mm where you rewind it back into its canister, and I wouldn't think it would be light proof left rolled up) ?

    With Well Wishes,

    Rob
     
  2. KillRamsey

    KillRamsey SC Hall of Famer

    Jun 20, 2012
    Cambridge, MA
    Kyle
    Medium format film has a light-tight black backing material to it, and you're winding it onto a spool with tall round "ends" that protect the edges of the film. So when you expose the last shot, you wind and wind and wind (so that your exposure gets covered by a new layer of film), then you open the camera and use the little tab of tape to seal it closed to itself. Now, it's a roll of black light-proof backing material on the outside, and black plastic spool ends.

    35mm film is just the film itself. Medium format has the backing paper.
     
  3. bobbywise

    bobbywise SC Regular

    43
    Jun 2, 2012
    Nantes, France
    Robert Wisbey
    Thanks Kyle,

    I understand that you keep rolling it up, then stick it down when you take it out.
    But the physicist in me is thinking that the photons of ambient light are of a small enough wavelength to get inside the thin gaps of a tightly rolled film of medium format film :)

    I guess it's ok :)
     
  4. Ripleysbaby

    Ripleysbaby supernatural anesthetist

    Sep 9, 2011
    Cumbria UK
    Garry
    I had a GW670, with that I had to open the back in subdued light. The spool never seemed to be wound tight enough. My 645 however was never a problem. Prepare yourself for the 690's shutter ! Let the seismic activity commence
     
  5. 480sparky

    480sparky SC Regular

    134
    Aug 24, 2015
    Ken
    120 film has been around since 1901. If light leak was an issue, I'm sure someone would have noticed it by now.
     
  6. SnapDawg

    SnapDawg Rorschach Test Pilot

    651
    Apr 18, 2014
    Canary Islands
    Ken
    You've got some GREAT cameras there - congrats ! (I have a GL690). Just practise a bit with an old roll and everything will be fine.
     
  7. dalethorn

    dalethorn Guest

    I've seen the result of light leaks in 35mm cartridges, usually in the first and last frames. Static electricity can be a light-flash problem when separating film from a spool when tape has to be pulled off.
     
  8. grillec

    grillec SC Veteran

    399
    Jan 16, 2014
    One time I had to open a film cassette at midday and sunshine because my first try to load it with 120 film led to a rip off the paper flag.
    After this I could develop a lot of the film without exposure marks. I wouldn't recommend this or the change of film at direct sunshine but normally it's save.
    The 120 film don't need to got rewinded in camera and is simpler to get it into a developing tank than a 35mm film, I think.
     
  9. 480sparky

    480sparky SC Regular

    134
    Aug 24, 2015
    Ken
    Do tell how one gets light leaks from a 35mm cannister on the last frames of the roll.
     
  10. dalethorn

    dalethorn Guest

    In the field, if the canister leaks, all frames are equal along the edges. In the darkroom, with static electricity, anything goes. Been there many times.