Urban Lions - Experiments in the 'large sensor look'

Discussion in 'Scenic, Architecture, and Travel' started by phrenic, May 29, 2013.

  1. phrenic

    phrenic SC Regular

    61
    Nov 14, 2012
    Some use the term the 'Brenzier method' after the guy who has made it popular recently, or 'bokehrama' or perhaps more accurately a series of stitched photos designed to emulate the shallow depth of field achieved by large sensored cameras (but that's not quite as catchy).

    Thought I would give it a shot with my new Supertakumar 85mm 1.8 on my Fuji X-E1, which should work better than my last try of a 50mm 1.8 on M43. Stitched with 6-9 shots using Microsoft ICE.

    But enough preamble:

    8885430163_abf5dab8d5_h.

    8886058258_644af319f1_h.
    Unfortunately, being closer up seems to have resulted in some leaning distortion. Oh well!

    Anyone else play around this technique?
     
  2. TraamisVOS

    TraamisVOS SC Hall of Famer

    Nov 29, 2010
    Melboune, Australia
    I'd be curious to try it but have no idea how to do it in LR.
     
  3. phrenic

    phrenic SC Regular

    61
    Nov 14, 2012
    You can't do it in LR (afaik). There is a photo composite tool in photoshop but the easy solution is to simply download microsofts free ICE software. Super simple, you drag your images into it and press the button to start! Should only take a few moments.
     
  4. bartjeej

    bartjeej SC Hall of Famer

    Nov 12, 2010
    bart
    Nice shots!
    I've been experimenting with the same method, only using continuous drive so that if there're moving subjects in the scene, there's a minimum of movement between shots - that should minimize duplications or people cut in half, if all goes according to plan. My experiments so far are at https://www.photographerslounge.org/f12/experiment-high-speed-version-brenizer-method-18519/

    Microsoft ICE is what I use too. Not a whole lot of options (very few actually) but it works pretty well right out of the box - and it's free :smile: haven't been able to get Hugin to work properly so far...
     
  5. phrenic

    phrenic SC Regular

    61
    Nov 14, 2012
    Yeah, me too. Simple is good though..Microsoft ICE has worked well enough that I don't have any burning desire to fiddle around in Hugin to try and make it do the same thing.

    And I do remember that shot, wasn't it posted at mu-43.com as well? :smile:

    I do wonder if it's a trade-off to fire continuously to get a bunch of fast shots, vs a more slow approach to plan out your rows, and hopefully not throw off the nodal point (I think that's the right word) too much.
     
  6. bartjeej

    bartjeej SC Hall of Famer

    Nov 12, 2010
    bart
    I might've posted one or more on FujiXspots, but not on mu43 (they were all shot with my X100).
    Nodal point (not sure about the word either but I think I know what you mean): on horizontal shots, I pinch the left hand side of the top and bottom panel between my left thumb and index finger (I often shoot at belly height), and pinch the shutter and right hand side of the bottom panel between my right thumb and index finger. Then I move one hand forward and the other one backward while keeping the shutter pressed, and the camera rotates around its centerline (which isn't exactly where the lens/sensor are, but it's close enough). This obviously doesn't work on vertical shots, and perhaps that's one of the reasons for the rather crooked results where buildings are concerned (together with the inevitable keystoning). I'm still very much in the experimental phase though!
     
  7. Luke

    Luke Super Moderator

    Nov 11, 2011
    Milwaukee, WI USA
    Luke
    would a tripod with a ball head solve the issue with the nodal point?
     
  8. bartjeej

    bartjeej SC Hall of Famer

    Nov 12, 2010
    bart
    I don't do tripods - they're wayyy too big for my liking! The X100 itself is already pushing it in terms of size for me...
    But if you're careful and considered when you're taking the shots (particularly if you're not using continuous drive) it shouldn't be a problem really, unless you have items really up-close to the camera.
     
  9. phrenic

    phrenic SC Regular

    61
    Nov 14, 2012
    I thought the issue even when mounted on tripod is that the pivot point (node) isn't lined up over the ball head (I guess it's somewhere in between the lens and sensor?). I'm no expert on it though and have been fairly happy using tripods in the past. Still, it can result in some leaning buildings. I've been doing all hand held recently but sloppiness has caused some gaps/errors in the composites.