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Which digital camera

Discussion in 'Herman's Genres' started by Herman, Oct 18, 2012.

  1. Herman

    Herman The Image Stimulator

    Jul 11, 2010
    The Netherlands
    Herman
    has direct dials aboard for iso, distance, shutter speed, aperture?

    Retro time back again!
     
  2. Lightmancer

    Lightmancer Super Moderator

    Aug 13, 2011
    Sunny Frimley
    Bill Palmer
    The X2, I believe.

    Sent from another Galaxy
     
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  3. Biro

    Biro SC All-Pro

    Aug 7, 2011
    Jersey Shore
    Steve
    The Fujifilm X100 might be close. A quote from DPReview: "It uses traditional analogue control dials for shutter speed, aperture and exposure compensation, alongside an electronically coupled (‘focus-by-wire’) manual focus ring." And on this page it says an external button is used for ISO:

    Fujifilm FinePix X100 In-Depth Review: Digital Photography Review

    The X-E1 might be the same.
     
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  4. Isoterica

    Isoterica SC Hall of Famer

    Dec 6, 2011
    I believe my G12 does, you can look at the camera here to see if it has what you are looking for. I had gotten it because the dials were similar to my dslr. *The camera does not look retro but it works like a standard settings type camera and since I wasn't sure if you meant retro in styling or in function I thought I would mention it.
     
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  5. Adam Quek

    Adam Quek SC Regular

    88
    Oct 5, 2012
    One of my old fav Epson RD-1 has lots of the odds dials and work like a true rangefinder. Check out this lovely review of the old rangefinder Epson R-D1 Review
     
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  6. ajramirez

    ajramirez SC All-Pro

    Jul 9, 2010
    Caguas, Puerto Rico
    Antonio
    Leica M.

    Cheers,

    Antonio
     
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  7. Herman

    Herman The Image Stimulator

    Jul 11, 2010
    The Netherlands
    Herman
    Thanks for the replies.
    Ill take a look into the prices.
     
  8. Gary

    Gary SC All-Pro

    Aug 19, 2012
    Southern California
    Gary Ayala
    OM-D, (I have ISO assigned to a button, so press the button then turn a dial).

    Gary
     
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  9. Herman

    Herman The Image Stimulator

    Jul 11, 2010
    The Netherlands
    Herman
    Does Oly OM-D "retro" buttons and dials have aboard?
     
  10. Gary

    Gary SC All-Pro

    Aug 19, 2012
    Southern California
    Gary Ayala
    Aboard?
     
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  11. sHmily963

    sHmily963  

    3
    Oct 20, 2012
    Don't know what to say, very happy to be here, to meet a lot of good friends, also hope to be able to help others to solve some problems.Thank you.:biggrin::biggrin::biggrin:
     
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  12. Herman

    Herman The Image Stimulator

    Jul 11, 2010
    The Netherlands
    Herman
    Nice to meet you here, welcome!
     
  13. Herman

    Herman The Image Stimulator

    Jul 11, 2010
    The Netherlands
    Herman
    Leica X2, Canon G12 have fixed (zoom) lenses.
    Epson RD-1: hard to find one, expensive, nice camera.
    Leica M: too expensive.

    What's left: Fuji X-E1 and Oly OM-D. Will check manual controls of both cams. And prices of course.
     
  14. Gary

    Gary SC All-Pro

    Aug 19, 2012
    Southern California
    Gary Ayala
    The OM-D does a lot of stuff well. It is a flexible camera with a very good and expanding system behind it. When I purchase a camera the two primary things I look at are output, (the quality of the final image especially at high ISO's as I shoot a lot of low light stuff) and how well does the camera/system mechanically perform when capturing the stuff I tend to shoot. Example: If you shoot astrophotography, does the system you're thinking of purchasing support that kind or photography, or macro or sports (long fast lenses). So examine how and what you shoot and make sure the camera/system supports that type of shooting. Make sure the camera you choose can EASILY deliver the images you shoot. We all know that expensive equipment does not make you a photographer. But what expensive equipment does is make it easier to capture the exceptional image and with greater consistency. So whatever you buy make sure that the camera/system can easily deliver the exceptional image for your type of shooting.

    I mostly shoot people. I shoot people in their environment, outside, inside, sports, moving slow, moving fast ... generally all sorts of people doing stuff. The impact from my photos is based upon people and what they're doing, not upon IQ. So I'm looking for a camera which mechanically handles fast, fast focus, fast manipulation of the settings, fast lens changes. The OM-D does that for me. I found the placement of buttons and dials less than perfect for my chubby, yet regal hands, but the grip helps, (and over time I'm sure the small bones in my hands will move to accomodate the camera).

    Two negative areas of the OM-D is the CAF just doesn't work. When shooting sports I just SAF and continuously pump the focus button to reacquire my focus. My keeper rate is significantly lower with the OM-D when compared to my 1Ds (granted the 1D is six times more expensive). Due to the extreme customization, inter-connected functions and complex menus, I found the camera extremely difficult to set up. If it was for the advice I read in the µ-4/3, I would have dumped the OM-D and stayed with my FF cameras. Only by reading the threads did I realize the camera can be set up to react nearly as fast an optical viewfinder dSLR, completely contrary to how the OM-D responds out of the box. Even now the setting will change on their own. The entire software/firmware experience with Olympus (this being my first interchangeable lens Olympus) has been frustrating, over time the frustrations have less, but man, compared to other cameras, the learning curve is long and painful. For me the OM-D was not a simple, intuitive camera. Unless you're willing to spend some time reading and messing with menus, shooting, reading messing with menus again ... over the course of days ... then you will experience frustrations.

    Other and lesser negatives. Short battery life.

    After all the important stuff is reviewed, then my last criterium is feel and looks. If all else is equal (or close to equal) then feel comes to play. All/most modern cameras are molded to the average human hand (the bigger the camera the more you have to work with ... hence a bigger camera should feel better). I put size in the "feel" category, for me the above factors of camera performance and camera system are more important than size and feel. One can adapt and through usage adapt very quickly to differences in camera layout and feel. So I use feel as a tie breaker.

    Looks, this is very important, a camera gotta look either sexy or extremely complex. Nikons are sexy all angles and stuff with a bold red stripe, Canons look dumpy with the bulbous pentaprism and tubular lenses that look like a thermos. If you gotta wear something off your shoulder or around your neck, it might as well be sexy.

    Just my two cents, hopefully something I said will be helpful.

    Gary
     
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  15. Isoterica

    Isoterica SC Hall of Famer

    Dec 6, 2011
    • Like Like x 1
  16. Herman

    Herman The Image Stimulator

    Jul 11, 2010
    The Netherlands
    Herman
    Thanks Gary and Kristen for your replies.

    Does Pentax Q (or the new Q10) have (a lot of) manual control dials/buttons?
     
  17. Isoterica

    Isoterica SC Hall of Famer

    Dec 6, 2011
    • Like Like x 1
  18. Luke

    Luke Super Moderator

    Nov 11, 2011
    Milwaukee, WI USA
    Luke
    OK, you gotta stop posting links to R-D1s or I'll be in DEEP trouble.
     
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  19. Isoterica

    Isoterica SC Hall of Famer

    Dec 6, 2011
    >:}
     
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  20. Gary

    Gary SC All-Pro

    Aug 19, 2012
    Southern California
    Gary Ayala
    +1
     
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